Saturday, January 28, 2017

Current Unit Learning Objectives & Essential Questions

READING

Unit 6: Looking Through the Informational Lens
3.1 Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonics. Students use the relationships between letters and sounds, spelling patterns, and morphological analysis to decode written English. Students are expected to:
(A) decode multisyllabic words in context and independent of context by applying common spelling patterns including:
(i) dropping the final "e" and add endings such as -ing, -ed, or -able (e.g., use, using, used, usable);
(B) use common syllabication patterns to decode words including:
(i) closed syllable (CVC) (e.g., mag-net, splendid);
(ii) open syllable (CV) (e.g., ve-to);
(iii) final stable syllable (e.g., puz-zle, con-trac-tion);
(E) monitor accuracy in decoding.
3.2 Reading/Beginning Reading/Strategies. Students comprehend a variety of texts drawing on useful strategies as needed. Students are expected to:
(A) use ideas (e.g., illustrations, titles, topic sentences, key words, and foreshadowing clues) to make and confirm predictions;
(B) ask relevant questions, seek clarification, and locate facts and details about stories and other texts and support answers with evidence from text; and
(C) establish purpose for reading selected texts and monitor comprehension, making corrections and adjustments when that understanding breaks down (e.g., identifying clues, using background knowledge, generating questions, re-reading a portion aloud).
3.4 Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:
(B) use context to determine the relevant meaning of unfamiliar words or distinguish among multiple meaning words and homographs;
(C) identify and use antonyms, synonyms, homographs, and homophones;
(E) alphabetize a series of words to the third letter and use a dictionary or a glossary to determine the meanings, syllabication, and pronunciation of unknown words.
3.12 Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A) identify the topic and locate the author's stated purposes in writing the text.
3.13 Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A) identify the details or facts that support the main idea;
(B) draw conclusions from the facts presented in text and support those assertions with textual evidence;
(C) identify explicit cause and effect relationships among ideas in texts;
(D) use text features (e.g., bold print, captions, key words, italics) to locate information and make and verify predictions about contents of text.
3.15 Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to:
(A) follow and explain a set of written multi-step directions;
(B) locate and use specific information in graphic features of text.
3.16 Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:
(A) understand how communication changes when moving from one genre of media to another;
(B) explain how various design techniques used in media influence the message (e.g., shape, color, sound); and
Figure 19 Reading/Comprehension Skills. Students use a flexible range of metacognitive reading skills in both assigned and independent reading to understand an author’s message. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts as they become self-directed, critical readers. The student is expected to:
(B) ask literal, interpretive, and evaluative questions of text;
(D) make inferences about text and use textual evidence to support understanding;
(E) summarize information in text, maintaining meaning and logical order;
(F) make connections (e.g.: thematic links, author analysis) between literary and information texts with similar ideas and provide textual evidence.
3.25 Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to:
(A) generate research topics from personal interests or by brainstorming with others, narrow to one topic, and formulate open-ended questions about the major research topic;
(B) generate a research plan for gathering relevant information (e.g., surveys, interviews, encyclopedias) about the major research question.
3.26 Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:
(A) follow the research plan to collect information from multiple sources of information, both oral and written, including:
(i) student-initiated surveys, on-site inspections, and interviews;
(ii) data from experts, reference texts, and online searches;
(iii) visual sources of information (e.g., maps, timelines, graphs) where appropriate;
(B) use skimming and scanning techniques to identify data by looking at text features (e.g., bold print, captions, key words, italics);
(C) take simple notes and sort evidence into provided categories or an organizer;
(D) identify the author, title, publisher, and publication year of sources;
(E) differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.
3.27 Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to:
(A) improve the focus of research as a result of consulting expert sources (e.g., reference librarians and local experts on the topic).
3.28 Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to
(A) draw conclusions through a brief written explanation and create a works-cited page from notes, including the author, title, publisher, and publication year for each source used.

Essential Questions:

  • What details and facts support the main idea, or central idea? 
  • What conclusions can you draw and support from the facts in the text? 
  • What cause and effect relationships are in the text? 
  • How do strategic readers use text features and graphic features? 
  • What strategies are helpful when researching information? 
  • How can I use the research process to explore, learn, and teach others about my topic?

WRITING

Unit 6: Looking Through the Informational Lens
3.20 Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
(A) create brief compositions that:
(i) establish a central idea in a topic sentence;
(ii) include supporting sentences with simple facts, details, and explanations; and
(iii) contain a concluding statement;
3.22 Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:
(A) use and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:
(i) verbs (past, present, and future);
(iii) adjectives (e.g., descriptive: wooden, rectangular; limiting: this, that; articles: a, an, the);
(vii) coordinating conjunctions (e.g., and, or, but);
(viii) time-order transition words and transitions that indicate a conclusion;
(B) use the complete subject and the complete predicate in a sentence;
(C) use complete simple and compound sentences with correct subject-verb agreement. 3.23 Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:
(B) use capitalization for:
(i) geographical names and places;
(ii) historical periods;
(C) recognize and use punctuation marks including:
(i) apostrophes in contractions and possessives;
(D) use correct mechanics including paragraph indentations.
3.24 Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:
(B) spell words with more advanced orthographic patterns and rules:
(ii) dropping final "e" when endings are added (e.g., -ing, -ed);
(iv) double consonants in the middle of words.

MATH

Unit 8: Finalizing Multiplication and Division Fact Strategies (Use a Rule, Build Down and Build Up, Last Facts) Multiplication and Division Computation 
3.4D determine the total number of objects when equally-sized groups of objects are combined or arranged in arrays up to 10 by 10; [arrays representing ones, twos, fours, fives, sixes, eights, nines, tens facts, and last facts: 3 x 3, 3 x 7, 7 x 3, and 7 x 7]; 3.4F recall facts [zeros, ones, twos, fours, fives, sixes,eights, nines, tens, and last facts: 3 x 3, 3 x 7, 7 x 3, and 7 x 7 facts in this unit] to multiply up to 10 by 10 with automaticity and recall the corresponding division facts; 
3.4H determine the number of objects in each group when a set of objects is partitioned into equal shares or a set of objects is shared equally; 3.4I determine if a number is even or odd using divisibility rules; 
3.4J determine a quotient using the relationship between multiplication and division; 
3.5D determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation [multiplying or dividing with 0,1,2, 4, 5, 6,8, 9, 10 or last facts: 3 x 3, 3 x 7, 7 x 3, and 7 x 7 in this unit] relating three whole numbers when the unknown is either a missing factor or product. 

Problem Solving Including Multiplicative Comparisons 
3.4K solve one-step and two-step problems involving multiplication and division within 100 [multiplying or dividing with 0, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10 and last facts: 3 x 3, 3 x 7, 7 x 3, and 7 x 7 in this unit] using strategies based on objects; pictorial models, including arrays, area models, and equal groups; properties of operations; or recall of facts; 
3.5C describe a multiplication expression as a comparison such as 3 x 24 represents 3 times as much as 24; [also representations with objects, pictorial models, strip diagrams] 

Representing 
3.4E represent multiplication facts [ones, twos, fours, fives, sixes, eights, nines, and tens facts in this unit] by using a variety of approaches such as repeated addition, equal-sized groups, arrays, area models, equal jumps on a number line, and skip counting; 
3.5B represent and solve one- and two-step multiplication and division problems [multiplying or dividing with 0, 1 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, or last facts: 3 x 3, 3 x 7, 7 x 3, and 7 x 7 in this unit] within 100 using arrays, strip diagrams, and equations; 
3.5E represent real-world relationships using number pairs in a table and verbal descriptions. [relationships related to multiplication or division by 0, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, or last facts: 3 x 3, 3 x 7, 7 x 3, and 7 x 7 in this unit]. 

Computational Fluency TEKS: Addition and Subtraction of 3-Digit Numbers 
3.4A solve with fluency one-step and two-step problems involving addition and subtraction within 1,000 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and the relationship between addition and subtraction; 
3.4B round to the nearest 10 or 100 or use compatible numbers to estimate solutions to addition and subtraction problems; Counting Coins and Bills 
3.4C determine the value of a collection of coins and bills. 

Spiral Review TEKS: Problem Solving with Data (All Four Operations) 
3.8A summarize a data set with multiple categories using a frequency table, dot plot, pictograph, or bar graph with scaled intervals; 
3.4A solve with fluency one-step and two-step problems involving addition and subtraction within 1,000 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and the relationship between addition and subtraction; 
3.4K solve one-step and two-step problems involving multiplication and division within 100 using strategies based on objects; pictorial models, including arrays, area models, and equal groups; properties of operations; or recall of facts; 
3.8B solve one- and two-step problems using categorical data represented with a frequency table, dot plot, pictograph, or bar graph with scaled intervals; Representing Equivalent Fractions (Objects, Pictorial Models, Number Lines, Strip Diagrams, with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8) 
3.3F represent equivalent fractions with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 using a variety of objects and pictorial models, including number lines; 
3.3A represent fractions greater than zero and less than or equal to one with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 using concrete objects and pictorial models, including strip diagrams and number lines; 
3.3B determine the corresponding fraction greater than zero and less than or equal to one with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 given a specified point on a number line; 
3.7A represent fractions of halves, fourths, and eighths as distances from zero on a number line; Generalizing and Explaining Fraction Equivalence (any denominator) 
3.3G explain that two fractions are equivalent if and only if they are both represented by the same point on the number line or represent the same portion of a same size whole for an area model; 
3.6E decompose two congruent two-dimensional figures into parts with equal areas and express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole and recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape. Solving Problems (specific denominators) 
3.3E solve problems involving partitioning an object or a set of objects among two or more recipients using pictorial representations of fractions with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8; 
2.9D determine the length of an object to the nearest [whole, half, fourth, or eighth inch] marked unit using rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, or measuring tapes Comparing with Reasoning (any denominator) 
3.3H compare two fractions having the same numerator or denominator in problems by reasoning about their sizes and justifying the conclusion using symbols, words, objects, and pictorial models. 

Essential Questions: 
  • Where do we see multiplication and division in the world around us? 
  • What rules do I know that I can use to multiply or divide more efficiently? 
  • How do I decide which strategy to use when multiplying or dividing numbers? 
  • How can I determine whether a number is even or odd? 
  • How can I use numbers and symbols to represent real-life situations? 
  • How can I use a table to better understand patterns in real-world relationships? 
  • How can I use number sentences to solve problems?

SCIENCE

Unit 7: Weather, The Sun and Water Cycle 
3.8 Earth and space. The student knows there are recognizable patterns in the natural world and among objects in the sky. The student is expected to: 
3.8A Observe, measure, record, and compare day-to-day weather changes in different locations at the same time that include air temperature, wind direction, and precipitation. 
3.8B Describe and illustrate the Sun as a star composed of gases that provides light and heat energy for the water cycle. 

Essential Questions: 
  • What observations and comparisons can we make about day to day weather conditions? 
  • What tools are used to gather weather data and how is it recorded? 
  • What is the Sun made of and what type of energy does it produce? 
  • What can we observe about the Sun's role in the water cycle?

SOCIAL STUDIES

Unit 4: The Free Enterprise System in Our World: Thinking Like an Economist 
3.6 Economics. The student understands the purposes of earning, spending, saving, and donating money. The student is expected to:
(A) identify ways of earning, spending, saving, and donating money; 
(B) create a simple budget that allocates money for spending, saving, and donating. 
3.7 Economics. The student understands the concept of the free enterprise system. The student is expected to: 
(A) define and identify examples of scarcity; 
(B) explain the impact of scarcity on the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services; 
(C) explain the concept of a free market as it relates to the U.S. free enterprise system. 
3.8 Economics. The student understands how businesses operate in the U.S. free enterprise system. The student is expected to: 
(A) identify examples of how a simple business operates;
(B) explain how supply and demand affect the price of a good or service; 
(C) explain how the cost of production and selling price affect profits; 
(D) explain how government regulations and taxes impact consumer costs; 
(E) identify individuals, past and present, including Henry Ford and other entrepreneurs in the community such as Mary Kay Ash, Wallace Amos, Milton Hershey, and Sam Walton, who have started new businesses. 
3.16 Science, technology, and society. The student understands how individuals have created or invented new technology and affected life in various communities, past and present. The student is expected to: 
(A) identify scientists and inventors, including Jonas Salk, Maria Mitchell, and others who have discovered scientific breakthroughs or created or invented new technology such as Cyrus McCormick, Bill Gates, and Louis Pasteur; 
(B) identify the impact of scientific breakthroughs and new technology in computers, pasteurization, and medical vaccines on various communities. 

Essential Questions:
  • How do businesses operate in a free enterprise system? 
  • Why is technology important in the free enterprise system?

Homework for the Week of Jan. 30 - Feb. 3, 2017

Please click on the links below to view the homework as a PDF.


Wednesday, January 25, 2017

14 Tools to Turn Game-Obsessed Kids into Genuine Game Designers

Check out this awesome webpage from Common Sense with some great apps, and websites for kids to start becoming game designers! It even has suggested ages next to each app/program. 

Homework for Week of Jan. 23 - 27

Please click on the links below to view the homework as a PDF.

Monday, January 16, 2017

January Reading, Math and Science Connections

Reading

Math & Science

Area At Home Activities

Current Learning Objectives & Essential Questions for All Subjects

MATH

In math we are currently about Numbers - The set of real numbers is infinite, and each real number can be associated with a unique point on the number line. Essential Question: What can we learn about numbers by locating and representing them on number lines? Equivalence - Any number, measure, numerical expression, algebraic expression, or equation can be represented in an infinite number of ways that have the same value. Essential Question: In what different ways can we show a number? Comparison - Numbers, expressions, and measures can be compared by their relative values. Essential Question: What can we learn about numbers by comparing them?

SCIENCE

In science, we are currently exploring and recording how soils are formed by weathering of rock and the decomposition of plant and animal remains, and exploring the characteristics of natural resources that make them useful in products and materials such as clothing and furniture and how resources may be conserved. Essential Questions: What is weathering? What can we observe about the way soils are formed? What are some natural resources that come from the Earth and how can they be conserved? What characteristics of natural resources make them useful to us?

SOCIAL STUDIES

In social studies we are currently identifying ways of earning, spending, saving, and donating money; creating a simple budget that allocates money for spending, saving, and donating; defining and identifying examples of scarcity; explaining the impact of scarcity on the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services; explaining the concept of a free market as it relates to the U.S. free enterprise system; identifying examples of how a simple business operates; explaining how supply and demand affect the price of a good or service; explaining how the cost of production and selling price affect profits; explaining how government regulations and taxes impact consumer costs; identifying individuals, past and present, including Henry Ford and other entrepreneurs in the community such as Mary Kay Ash, Wallace Amos, Milton Hershey, and Sam Walton, who have started new businesses; identifying scientists and inventors, including Jonas Salk, Maria Mitchell, and others who have discovered scientific breakthroughs or created or invented new technology such as Cyrus McCormick, Bill Gates, and Louis Pasteur, and identifying the impact of scientific breakthroughs and new technology in computers, pasteurization, and medical vaccines on various communities. Essential Questions: How do businesses operate in a free enterprise system? Why is technology important in the free enterprise system?

READING

In reading we are currently analyzing, making inferences and drawing conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to paraphrase the themes and supporting details of fables, legends, myths, or stories; comparing and contrasting the settings in myths and traditional folktales, and understanding, making inferences and drawing conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to describe the interaction of characters including their relationships and the changes they undergo [as relates to comprehending folktales]. Essential Questions: What elements make folktales, fables, legends, and myths different from realistic fiction? How do characters, plot, theme and setting work together in traditional literature stories?

WRITING

In writing, we are currently writing literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to write imaginative stories that build the plot to a climax and contain details about the characters and setting. Essential Questions: What language in the story creates a picture in your mind or appeals to your senses? How do writers use the writing process as they write imaginative stories?

Homework for the Week Jan. 17 – 20, 2017

Please click on the links below to view the homework as a PDF.

Sunday, January 8, 2017

Learning Objectives Jan. 9 - 13, 2017

MATH

In math we are currently determining the area of rectangles with whole number side lengths in problems using multiplication related to the number of rows times the number of unit squares in each row; decomposing composite figures formed by rectangles into non-overlapping rectangles to determine the area of the original figure using the additive property of area, and decomposing two congruent two-dimensional figures into parts with equal areas and express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole and recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape.

SCIENCE

In science we are currently exploring and recording how soils are formed by weathering of rock and the decomposition of plant and animal remains.

SOCIAL STUDIES

In social studies we are currently identifying ways of earning, spending, saving, and donating money, and explaining how supply and demand affect the price of a good or service.

READING

In reading we are currently analyzing, making inferences and drawing conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to paraphrase the themes and supporting details of fables, legends, myths, or stories; comparing and contrasting the settings in myths and traditional folktales, and understanding, making inferences and drawing conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to describe the interaction of characters including their relationships and the changes they undergo [as relates to comprehending folktales].

WRITING

In writing we are currently writing literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to write imaginative stories that build the plot to a climax and contain details about the characters and setting.

Homework Jan. 9-13, 2017

Please click on the links below to view the homework as a PDF.

January Reading Log

Please click on the link below to view the reading log as a PDF.