Sunday, May 28, 2017

Living Museum


The BIG DAY is almost here and everyone has worked very hard researching, writing, and practicing.  Our performance for Living Museum is Wednesday, May 31 from 8:00-8:40 A.M.  Here are some things to remember:
  • Please have your child at school in costume by 7:40 a.m.  Students should QUIETLY go to their classroom. Please see below for presentation locations.
  • The performance will end shortly after 8:30 A.M.  We will take a class picture after the performance, and students go back to class, take restroom breaks to change.
  • Although we anticipate all students will perform, we understand that schedule conflicts occur.  If your child is unable to attend, please send awritten excuse to his/her teacher.
  • Please have your child bring an extra set of clothes to change into after their presentations since we have P.E. this day.
We are looking forward to this exciting performance.  It is always the highlight of the year, and we know you will be impressed with the presentations. Bring your camera!!  See you there! 

Many of you want to visit another child, sibling, or friend.  Here are the presentation locations of the 3rd Grade Classes.  Make sure to come to school on time at 7:40 a.m. dressed in your costume. Thank you!

Chamness- Cafeteria
Flansburg – Kinder Hall
Moeller - Cafeteria
Riojas - Main hallway next to gym
Steele - Front foyer next to office
Vargas - Main hallway across from the gym

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Third Grade Field Trip to Texas Memorial Museum May 17, 2017


Our final field trip of the year, sponsored by our awesome PTA, will be to Texas Memorial Museum Wednesday, May 17, 2017. We will be exploring the museum and visiting many different exhibits which include prehistoric life, evolution, rocks and minerals, and Texas wildlife.


We will be leaving school at 9:15 am. Our tour of the museum will be from 10:00-11:30am. We will be eating lunch on site at 11:30am and returning to school by 1:30pm.


Parent chaperones are needed and encouraged! Admission is only $1.00 and you can pay when you arrive at the museum. We’d love to have as many parents as possible!


Please fill out and return the forms below to your child’s teacher as soon as possible.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Current Unit Learning Objectives & Essential Questions

MATH

Unit 10: Deepening Reasoning of Multiplication and Division Relationships and Extending Multiplication Fact Strategies 
Students need to work with area models of real base ten blocks and use pictorial representations of those models area models first before any other written strategies are shared. Once students understand those partial products, connections can be made to algorithms including the standard algorithm for recording those partial products.

Computation 

Students multiply a two-digit number with a one-digit number using mental math strategies, using partial products and area models, and the commutative, associative, and distributive properties. All of these types of thinking involve students seeing ahead of time how large the solution might be (estimation and knowledge of place value.) Time spent with invented strategies will pay off in students understanding other algorithms. When students work with algorithms, they may progress through a series of ways to record their solutions. The standard algorithm is just a recording strategy that may or may not save time, may or may not produce efficiency or accuracy. The standard algorithm utilizes single digit thinking and has a specific recording style. Students need to see how these models of recording work in order to determine flexibly what the best strategy is for them concerning the numbers used in the problem. 

Problem Solving - Multiplying with Larger Numbers 

Students solve multiplication problems including multiplicative comparisons with larger numbers. The CGI structures for multiplication will help students to determine what the situation is about. Students will use representations to help them understand the problem type. Students will solve one-step and two-step problems based on objects, pictorial models, arrays, area models, and equal groups, properties of operations, or recall of facts. Problem situations including bringing back up work with categorical data - solving problems that involve using a frequency table, dot plot, pictograph, or bar graph with scaled intervals. Students also use multiplicative comparison expressions to solve problems involving multiplication of a number and a comparative factor.

Representations of Multiplication with Larger Numbers 

In working with multiplication problems, students use representations to help them understand what is happening in the situation. These include arrays, strip diagrams, and equations. Students need to use their understandings from the problem situation to develop these models that show those relationships and may help with comprehension.

Multiplication and Division Relationships

Students solve problems where understanding the relationships between multiplication and division help support the multiplicative thinking necessary for these types of problems. STAAR has included solving problems given a contextual situation and having strip diagrams that display the relationship of a dividend with a given number of groups, but the amount in each group is missing as the resulting choices for answers. The strip diagram is similar to the one shown below: 

In the above diagram, students use the relationship between multiplication and division when they find a missing factor that involves 18 groups x ___ = 54. Although students do not solve problems like 54 divided by 18 (just a one-digit divisor in grade 3), they can use problem solving and reasoning to figure this out as a multiplication with missing factor situation.

They also represent real-world relationships using number pairs in a table and verbal descriptions. Many of these problems are easier to solve if students used their understandings of the relationship between multiplication and division in figuring out the pattern in the table. Students may be given the verbal description then has to find or create the table of values that would work with that situation. They may also be given a table of values that models a relationship given in a problem situation and then has to make decisions about what can be true about the relationships having to find or create verbal descriptions that match the relationships in the table.

Connecting Big Ideas

Operation Meanings & Relationships - The same number sentence (e.g. 12-4=8) can be associated with different concrete or real-world situations, AND different number sentences can be associated with the same concrete or real-world situation. (TEKS 3.4K, 3.5B-C)


  • Students have been working with equations and expressions that represent different problem situations.
  • In this unit, students continue that work including problems that have larger numbers as factors and also multiplicative comparisons. They work with a number sentence to rewrite it as a division or multiplication sentence depending on how they determine they want to solve a problem using their understandings of those two operations.
  • In units 12 and 13 these TEKS are in spiral review.

  • Properties - For a given set of numbers there are relationships that are always true, and these are the rules that govern arithmetic and algebra. (TEKS 3.4G, 3.4K)

  • Students have been working with properties to find solutions to problems involving multiplication and division especially with the 9s and 6s facts.
  • In this unit, students use the distributive property as they learn to use the area model for multiplying 2-digit by 1-digit factors. They may also use the commutative or associative properties as they make decisions about how to think about the numbers in a problem situation. If they use compensation to make the problem easier, they may be using the associative property where they decompose a number in order to compose new easier forms to work with.
  • In units 16 and 17, these TEKS are revisited during computational fluency or spiral review.

  • Basic Facts & Algorithms - Basic facts and algorithms for operations with rational numbers use notions of equivalence to transform calculations into simpler ones. (TEKS 3.4G) 

  • In unit 13, students us the Build Up Build Down multiplication strategies to learn the 6s facts and used strategies to learn the 0s, 1s, and 8s division facts.
  • In this unit, students use strategies and algorithms to find products of 2-digit by 1-digit numbers. They can extend the mental strategies for basic facts to larger numbers. They also work on the multiplication algorithm.


  • In units 12 and 13, these TEKS will be included in the focus TEKS or in computational fluency or spiral review.

  • Variable - 
    Mathematical situations and structures can be translated and represented abstractly using variables, expressions, and equations. (TEKS 3.5B, 3.5D)



  • Students have used variables in expressions and equations for addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division involving numbers with the basic facts.
  • In this unit, students will write equations with variables in any term in the equation. Students would then have to decide if this representation was a multiplication or division situation.
  • In unit 12, these TEKS will be included in the focus work of the unit.

  • Relations & Functions - Mathematical rules (relations) can be used to assign members of one set to members of another set. A special rule (function) assigns each member of one set to a unique member of the other set. (TEKS 3.5E)

  • Students have been working with relationships between pairs of numbers in addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division situations with basic facts.
  • In this unit, students work with larger numbers in tables and related pairs finding the multiplication or division relationship between the sets of numbers and use the relationship between multiplication and division to find solutions.
  • In unit 12, this is a TEKS in the STAAR Review unit.

  • Equations & Inequalities - 
    Rules of arithmetic and algebra can be used together with notions of equivalence to transform equations and inequalities so solutions can be found. (TEKS 3.5B, 3.5D)


  • In previous units, students have used equivalence to help them find solutions relating addition and subtraction and also relating multiplication and division.
  • In this unit, students write equivalent expressions for area models. 38 × 6 can be thought of as 30 × 6 + 8 × 6; or 10 × 6 + 10 × 6 + 10 × 6 + 8 ×6. They also continue to use comparison expressions and how these are different than equal group expressions.
  • In unit 12, these TEKS are in the STAAR Review unit. 


  • Essential Questions: 
    Variable - 

    Mathematical situations and structures can be translated and represented abstractly using variables, expressions, and equations. (TEKS 3.5B, 3.5D)

    Relations & Functions - 

    Mathematical rules (relations) can be used to assign members of one set to members of another set. A special rule (function) assigns each member of one set to a unique member of the other set. (TEKS 3.5E)

    Equations & Inequalities - 

    Rules of arithmetic and algebra can be used together with notions of equivalence to transform equations and inequalities so solutions can be found. (TEKS 3.5B, 3.5D)


    SCIENCE

    Unit 9: Adaptations and Traits
    The student is expected to explore how structures and functions of plants and animals allow these organisms to survive in a particular environment. The student is expected to explore the concept that some characteristics of organisms are inherited, such as the number of limbs on an animal or flower color, and recognize that some behaviors are learned in response to living in a certain environment, such as animals using tools to get food.

    In second grade, students observed, recorded, and compared how the physical characteristics and behaviors of animals help them meet their basic needs, such as fins help fish move and balance in the water. Also, students observed, recorded, and compared how the physical characteristics of plants helped them meet their basic needs, such as stems carry water throughout the plant. Students also studied how an animal’s basic needs are met by using their physical characteristics and behaviors to help them. For example, a fish uses its fins to help it swim and escape predators.

    In third grade, students will focus on how those adaptations are suited to a specific type of environment. Students will extend understandings of how traits and behaviors came about, and the fact that traits are inherited and behaviors are learned.

    Essential Questions:


  • What are some structures and functions of animals that allow them to survive in cold weather?
  • What are some structures and functions of plants that allow them to survive in hot and dry conditions?
  • What can we observe about the inherited characteristics of animals and plants?
  • What can we observe about animal behaviors learned in response to their environment?


  • Social studies

    Unit 3.5 Communities Over Time in Our World 
    Students will examine how individuals have influenced communities over time and the characteristics of communities using the concepts of time and chronology.
    Standards
    Specifications
    History. The student understands how individuals, events, and ideas have influenced the history of various communities. The student is expected to:
    describe how individuals, events, and ideas have changed communities, past and present
    DESCRIBE
    How have individuals, events, and ideas changed communities, past and present?
    Suggested examples:
    Individuals
    • Stephen F. Austin- brought Anglo Americans to Texas

    Event
    • NASA – When Lyndon Baines Johnson brought NASA to Houston, the economy of Houston and Texas improved and brought other types of businesses in the areas of technology, aerospace, and medicine
    • Round Rock Express- brought jobs and a sports team they identify with (entertainment)
    • Samsung and Dell- increased the number of jobs and encouraged other technology businesses to move to the Austin area

    Ideas
    • Resource Conservation - Austin will become one of the first green cities in America because they support reducing, recycling, and reusing waste
    History. The student understands how individuals, events, and ideas have influenced the history of various communities. The student is expected to:
    identify individuals, including Pierre-Charles L'Enfant, Benjamin Banneker, and Benjamin Franklin, who have helped to shape communities
    IDENTIFY
    Who are individuals that have helped to shape communities?

    Pierre-Charles L'Enfant
    • City planner from France hired by George Washington to draw the city plans for Washington DC.

    Benjamin Banneker
    • A surveyor, a person who studies and measures land areas.
    • In 1791, Banneker helped Major Andrew Ellicott plan the boundaries of the District of Columbia, the center of the U.S. government.
    Benjamin Franklin
    • Publish the Poor Richard’s Almanac that kept up people’s spirits and kept citizens informed about the weather, recipes, and home remedies
    • Published newspapers that kept citizens informed about what the English were doing
    • Improved his community by improving streets and starting one of the first fire department and library
    • Participated in the events that led to the American independence
    History. The student understands how individuals, events, and ideas have influenced the history of various communities. The student is expected to:
    describe how individuals, including Daniel Boone, Christopher Columbus, the Founding Fathers, and Juan de Oñate, have contributed to the expansion of existing communities or to the creation of new communities.
    DESCRIBE
    How have individuals contributed to the expansion of existing communities or to the creation of new communities?
    Daniel Boone
    • Responsible for the exploration and settlement of Kentucky

    Christopher Columbus
    • In 1492, Columbus sailed west to find a route to the East Indies but found the Island of the Caribbean that resulted in the exploration and colonization of the New World.

    The Founding Fathers
    • Businessmen in the colonies
    • Designed the law of the land for the United States
    • Thomas Jefferson – Signed the Louisiana Purchase

    Juan de Onate
    • Explored the southwest and reported back to Spain about its potential
    • Established the settlement of El Paso del Norte (present day El Paso) and celebrated the first known Thanksgiving in North America.
    • Helped settled many communities down the Rio Grande River
    History. The student understands common characteristics of communities, past and present. The student is expected to:
    identify reasons people have formed communities, including a need for security, religious freedom, law, and material well-being
    IDENTIFY
    What are reasons people have formed communities?
    • Need for security
    • Religious Freedom
    • Law
    • Material Well-Being
    History. The student understands common characteristics of communities, past and present. The student is expected to:
    identify ways in which people in the local community and other communities meet their needs for government, education, communication, transportation, and recreation
    IDENTIFY
    How have people in the local community and other communities meet their needs for government, education, communication, transportation, and recreation?
    Communities in the United States
    Government
    • Mayor/City Council/City Manager, Departments that provide a service

    Education
    • Elementary, Middle, and High School/Mandatory/Expected to go to college
    • Public Schools
    • Private Schools
    • Home School

    Communication
    • Letters, Cell Phone, Emails, Television, Radio

    Transportation
    • Automobile, Airplane, Trains, Bicycles

    Recreation
    • Electronic Games
    • Sports – Outdoor, Indoor
    • Movies-TV
    • Family Time
    History. The student understands common characteristics of communities, past and present. The student is expected to:
    compare ways in which various other communities meet their needs
    COMPARE
    How do various communities meet their needs?
    Compare the categories and examples in 3.2B with communities across the United States and other nations
    History. The student understands the concepts of time and chronology. The student is expected to:
    use vocabulary related to chronology, including past, present, and future times
    USE
    Use vocabulary related to chronology
    Concept of chronology
    • Define chronological order as the arrangement of events according to the time that they happened in relation to each other.
    Including
    • Past-the time before now
    • Present-the time now.
    • Future-the time that is to come
    History. The student understands the concepts of time and chronology. The student is expected to:
    create and interpret timelines
    CREATE AND INTERPRET
    Create and interpret timelines
    Timelines
    • Convey a sense of change or movement over time by illustrating events.
    History. The student understands the concepts of time and chronology. The student is expected to:
    apply the terms year, decade, and century to describe historical times
    APPLY
    Apply terms to describe historical times
    • Years – Every 365 days
    • Decade-  A period of time lasting 10 years
    • Century-  A period of time lasting 100 years

    Essential Questions:


  • How do communities change over time?
  • Why is the past important to communities?


  • READING

    Grade Unit 8 - Bridging Reader Strategies and Skills to the Test GenreThis unit bundles literary and informational texts reading TEKS so that third graders revisit and review reading strategies and apply skills across the genres assessed on STAAR. 

    In preparation for the state reading assessment, students will return to prior genres of study covered in the year to deepen their application of reading skills, strategies, and grow in their targeted areas of need (based on various assessments including: conferring records, small group records, BAS, common assessments, and other anecdotal records). Students will bridge their understanding of supporting their thinking with textual evidence to answering reading assessment items. As students engage with text, response to reading can include both oral and written response to text. Time will be spent teaching third graders necessary test taking strategies so they are well prepared for the test genre. 

    Essential Questions:
    Reading strategies and skills help readers monitor and construct meaning across a variety of genres.


  • What strategies am I using successfully as a reader?
  • What strategies do I need to use with more consistency as a reader?
  • What strategies will help me successfully understand and answer questions on reading passages?
  • How do words, images and graphics work together in a reading passage?


  • WRITING

    Unit 8 - Bridging Reader Strategies and Skills to the Test GenreWriters will return to writing essays in order to strengthen their knowledge of these standards. Students will use the writing process and apply oral and written conventions with greater skill.

    Essential Questions:Facts, details, and explanations support the central idea of an essay.



  • How does the organization of ideas support the central idea in essays?
  • How do writers build the body of expository essays?